MAY 2015

Sun with Flowers

HUMOR

FROM ALFIE: Old Ole is driving home on the express-way, when he decides to try out his newfangled cell-phone. He reaches Emma OK, but she is upset!

“Oh Ole,” she cries. “I just heard on the TV news that there is a car going the wrong way on the express-way. Please be careful!”

“One car?” hollers Ole. “Hell, there’s hundreds of ‘em!”

CHILDREN’S POETRY: I’m a little Hindoo. I do all I kindoo. Where my pants and shirt don’t meet I make my little skindoo.

MOTHER GOOSE:

Mistress Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow? With cockle-shells, and silver bells, And pretty maids all in a row.

Hickory, dickory, dock,
The mouse ran up the clock;
The clock struck one,
The mouse ran down,
Hickory, dickory, dock.

Hey, diddle, diddle, - The cat and the fiddle – The cow jumped over the moon – The little dog laughed – To see such sport – And the dish ran away with the spoon.

EDITORIAL OPINIONS

1. One day last March, I was feeling quite depressed as I looked out my window. Seeing some snow on the ground, I got out my oval plastic sled and slid down the hill. And indeed I had the same feeling of glee and excitement that I had when I was about 7 years old. Needless to say the rest of my day was more cheerful.

2. Both Garret and Bodan are about 7 or 8 years old. Every weekday morning they wait for the school bus in front of my home. Usually they kick stones or sticks around and mumble comments to each other and share half-smiles. The boys are quite different – Garret is full of innocent-faced enthusiasm for life and Bodan is quiet and withdrawn, always. Yet they find ways to communicate each morning, as I watch them. I think that they are good for each other.

3. Near the end of last March we got a snowfall of about 7 inches. The snow was heavy with moisture. And as I stood in my driveway contemplating the difficult job of removing it, I heard a voice say, “That looks like a Larken job.” So I tossed my snow shovel in the direction of my neighbor, Larken Rose, and he began to remove the snow. I commented to him, “You have no idea how happy I am to see someone besides me, shoveling my driveway.” He laughed good-naturedly.

HUMOR

What would happen if you cross a crocodile with an abalone? You get a crocabalone.

What flowers grow under your nose? Tulips

FROM VIOLA RIDGWAY’S LEST WE FORGET

1. When the work on the Cathedral was started we were in a good place [South Ave] to see the Italian craftsmen walking past our house everyday from the train to the hill next to Lesher’s woods where the ground was being broken and the rocks removed in preparation for the marvelous building that was going to be erected up there. The workmen came in the morning and left at five – we could hear the chatter as they spoke to each other in Italian. They were all very friendly and some would wave to the children who stopped their games on the roads to let the stream of workmen pass.

2. It is difficult indeed for people living today, who are surrounded, as it were, with doctors and nurses and get-at-able hospitals, to realize what life must have been like in those days of Bryn Athyn. When people came from the city to live out here – beautiful as it was – it had nothing that made life easy for the householders. No electricity, no telephones, no water in many cases, except pumps, no doctors….When Dr. Starkey came out with the enthusiastic young people and brought his wife with him, it must have been a fine feeling to have a real Doctor among them…. In May 1895 the house Dr. Starkey and his wife planned and built and moved into, is [was] the large white house on South Ave….It was duly dedicated and named Englehame….The house was at once put to use in the service of social life…..When it came time for Dr. Starkey to leave Englehame for his home in heaven…the good Doctor was the first person to be buried in the new Bryn Athyn Cemetery. His wife, Margaret Pitcairn, died six years later.

FROM RICHARD LINQUIST’S CATHEDRAL BOOK

SANDSTONE WALLS

Here is an illuminating piece of history from Mr. Richard R. Gladish’s biography of John Pitcairn regarding the use of sandstone. “John Pitcairn was consulted from time to time and kept abreast of progress on the church building. He told Cram that he wanted ‘no dark and narrow church’; and once while John was abroad he had a cable from Raymond asking his advice about lining the cathedral’s granite walls with sandstone – something which was afterward done.” (p. 350)

This tan stone appears warm like wood in contrast to a coldness that is often associated with stone. It does help to avoid the darkness that John Pitcairn disliked in a church, as can be seen on a sunny day when light comes through the grisaille and stained glass windows to color and brighten the tannish sandstone walls and columns.

Gunny said, “This (sandstone) was sawed with a six inch diamond pointed saw and then it was tooled. All these marks were tooled by hand – these diagonal marks.” This was before the walls were set.

The sandstone was quarried near Cleveland, Ohio. As I recall Gunny said that they came from, Berea, which is a western suburb of Cleveland. Stone from this quarry has been used in governmental buildings in Washington, D.C. and in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia.

EDITORIAL OPINION

Sometimes I have used SUNSHINE MAGAZINE as a bully pulpit to present truths to some members of the board of trustees of the Bryn Athyn Church in 1981 and to the pastor then who decided to remove me from my service as the Cathedral Curator. My goal was to bring enlightenment to the dark corners of their minds. I firmly believed that some of these men were devoid of truth’s light, as is seen in their apparently beloved but erroneous concept that I was a gay man.

One day in January 1981 before a church service began I was standing outside of the Cathedral greeting people. I saw a member of the board of the trustees with his wife, approaching me. The husband shouted at me, “There’s the queer.” His wife appeared to be upset and she grabbed her husband by his shoulder to stop him. He shook off her hand, roughly. As he got closer to me, he shouted again, “There’s the queer.” And again his wife grabbed his shoulder, it seemed to me, with all of her strength. He shook off her restraining hand violently as he strode toward me. I studied his apparent insane, hate-filled eyes.

About two months later as this man sat at the desk in the Michael Tower of the Cathedral, I placed a booklet in front of him. It had one word on it – GUILT. Immediately he looked me in the eyes and said, “But God forgives.” I was stunned as I envisioned him on his knees before the God of all creation, the LORD JESUS CHRIST. I saw a humbled and broken man who had implored the Lord for forgiveness. And I felt my soul being flooded with angelic warmth. Instantly I forgave him. Needless to say we became friends after that. We shared many understanding smiles until his days on earth were ended.

My friends, don’t slander anyone but if you do, repent quickly.

QUOTATIONS

“The confession of evil works is the first beginning of good works.” - Saint Augustine

“It has been said that so far as man shuns what is evil he wills what is good. This is so because evils and goods are opposites; for evils are from hell and goods from heaven; therefore so far as hell, that is, evil, is removed, so far heaven approaches and man looks to good.” - Emanuel Swedenborg THE TRUE CHRISTIAN RELIGION no.330

“The destiny of man is in his own soul.” - Herodotus

“Hold your head high, stick your chest out. You can make it. It gets dark sometimes, but morning comes….” - Rev. Jesse Jackson

“If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imaged, he will meet with success unexpected in common hours.” - Thoreau

“Sadness flies away on the wings of time.” - Jean de La Fontaine

IDEAS

Teach children to behave at home and they will know how to behave elsewhere.

Be discriminating about what images and ideas you permit into your mind.

Look forward to your next adventure.

POETRY

THE PILLAR OF THE CLOUD by John Henry Cardinal Newman

Lead, Kindly Light, amid the encircling gloom – Lead Thou me on! – The night is dark, and I am far from home – Lead Thou me on! – Keep Thou my feet – I do not ask to see – The distant scene – one step enough for me.

I was not ever thus, nor pray’d that Thou – Shouldst lead me on. – I loved to choose and see my path – but now – Lead Thou me on! – I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears – Pride ruled my will: remember not my past years.

So long Thy power hath blest me, sure it still – Will lead me on – O’er moor and fen, o’er crag and torrent, till – The night is gone. And with the morn those angel faces smile – Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile.

EDITOR’S NOTE: “The pillar of cloud” is from Exodus 13, 21-22.

“And Jehovah went before them by day in a pillar of cloud, to lead them in the way; and by night in a pillar of fire, to give them light; to go by day and by night.

“The pillar of cloud by day, and the pillar of fire by night, departed not from before the people.”

BRYN ATHYN HISTORY FROM THE BRYN ATHYN POST

JUNE 12, 1941 The traffic jam last Saturday – a score of cars and a chartered bus – was the Dickens Fellowship, Philadelphia Chapter, which visited the Cathedral, had tea with Don Rose and inspected the newly-built sleeping shed in his yard, and adjourned to the lawn of the E.R. Cronlunds for a picnic supper. About 115 persons attended.

FEBRUARY 5, 1942 The Civic and Social Club plans to present Gilbert and Sullivan’s “Yeomen of the Guard” on May 9th, and is in search of a chorus. Anyone interested is asked to get in touch with Mr. Frank Bostock.

FEBRUARY 26, 1942 Mr. David Simons stopped in Bryn Athyn last week on leave from a Florida [military] camp. He is in the regimental band….

Mr. Carl Soneson visited Bryn Athyn last week on leave from Camp Belvoir.

APRIL 9, 1942 “My Own Four Walls” by Don Rose is being published in Braille by the American Red Cross.

MAY 7, 1942 The telephone company sent notices to all Bethayres subscribers recently, announcing that after the directories are distributed next July this exchange will be known as “Chapel Hill.”

SEPTEMBER 17, 1942 First Lieutenant [Doctor] Andrew Doering has received orders to active duty with the Air Force in Florida, and he will not be in his office after Saturday, September 19th.